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Opportunities Database

Faculty, Post-Docs, and Graduate Students: Click here to post a research opportunity.

NOTE: If you are eligible for Federal Work-Study (FWS), you can find hundreds of research opportunities on the FWS website. To find out if you are eligible or if you are new to having a FWS award, visit the UNC FWS website. If you are a returning student who already completed the mandatory training and has access to JobX, log in and click “Find a Job” under the student menu. From there, click the “Research Jobs” button in the middle of the page.

Students with or without FWS can use the database below to look for opportunities.


Research Assistant/Volunteer – Medical Education Experiences and Physician Career Plans

Post Date
10/18/2021
Description

I’m seeking an undergraduate research assistant (volunteer) to assist with transcribing interviews from my dissertation research study on medical education. All transcripts are initially transcribed using AI software. Your role will be to listen to the interview audio and make sure the transcript matched the audio and is ready for analysis. This position is great for anyone interested in a social science profession and/or a career in healthcare. You’ll learn a lot about the experiences of current medical students and residents in the process! I hope to help you to learn about the process of conducting qualitative social science research, and in so doing prepare you for a research-oriented career.

Faculty Advisor
Lisa D. Pearce
Research Supervisor
Alyssa Browne
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
11/20/2021

Undergraduate Researcher in the Servedio Lab

Post Date
10/06/2021
Description

How do new species form? The formation of new species – ‘speciation’ – is still not fully understood, and remains a fruitful avenue of research. Here, we propose to investigate the implication of the evolution of genetic architecture (i.e., the location of genes along the genome) for the evolution of reproductive isolation (i.e., the inability of an incipient species to breed successfully with other incipient species) that eventually leads to the emergence of distinct species.

We recently analyzed a simple mathematical model, and we showed that the genetic architecture of the traits underlying speciation should not evolve as usually thought. This preliminary result is very promising with important implications for the interpretations of current genomic data. In order to understand the significance of the results derived from this simple model, we need to determine whether the predictions made hold with a more complex multi-loci genetic architecture, as observed in nature. To develop this project, we are hiring an undergraduate student to develop and analyze an individual-based model in order to study how genetic loci may co-localize along the genome during speciation. This would provide an educational experience for the student that could lead to contributions of significant scientific value. For more details on the project and mentoring plan, student candidates can contact taubier@unc.edu

Payment:  $7,250 stipend, for approximately 20 weeks at 10hrs/week during the semesters plus 35hrs/week for 8 weeks in the summer (at $15/hr).

Student candidates must send:

1) a list of relevant coursework and grades obtained,
2) a brief description of their research or programming experience,
3) a brief statement of their interest in the project,
4) a brief diversity statement

to servedio@email.unc.edu and taubier@unc.edu

Faculty Advisor
Maria P. Servedio
Research Supervisor
Thomas G. Aubier
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
11/01/2021

Japanese History Lab – Research Assistant

Post Date
09/22/2021
Description

We engage in collaborative learning, shared mentorship, research training and advanced research, professional development through workshops and internship opportunities, consulting with global companies, and a variety of forms of public-facing education, publication, and community engagement around various topics in Japanese history.

The student will join our research group, jointly based in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and the Department of History. Please apply by 11-11-2021 with a resume and an application letter.

Topics of current interest in the lab include:

Changes in representation of key Japanese historical figures
Diachronic analysis of the samurai as a cultural archetype
Problematizing national and cultural heroes in contemporary Japan
The social history and reception of the policies of Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537-1598)
Material culture and daily life in late medieval and early modern Japan
The history, aesthetics, and politics of Japanese tea culture (chanoyu)
The archaeology and environmental history of premodern Japanese cities
Early modern (Edo or Tokugawa period) political ritual and pageantry
Modern Japanese national identity

Our lab, led by Professor Morgan Pitelka, includes local high school students; current and former undergraduates interested in researching Japanese history; M.A. students in the DAMES graduate program; Ph.D. students in the Asian History field from the History department; and postdocs and other affiliated scholars from the Triangle and beyond.

Student will work alongside lab researchers researching and writing about Japanese history.

Faculty Advisor
Morgan Pitelka
Research Supervisor
Morgan Pitelka
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
09/21/2022

Research Assistant – Genetic/Environmental Factors in Preeclampsia

Suggested Fields
Post Date
09/15/2021
Description

Study the roles of Genetic/environmental factors in preeclampsia (pregnancy induced maternal syndromes).

Learn basic techniques of molecular biology such as PCR, Western Blot, Immunohistochemistry etc.

Faculty Advisor
Feng Li
Research Supervisor
Feng Li
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
09/03/2022

Research Assistant – Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Post Date
09/14/2021
Description

We study how the NuRD complex contributes to the silencing of fetal hemoglobin. My lab uses a combination of structural biology, biophysics, and tissue culture assays to understand how proteins bind to one another and to DNA. Our goal is to develop inhibitors of this complex as a potential therapy for blood disorders (sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia) as well as acute leukemia.

The student will be involved in protein purification, binding assays using fluorescence polarization and ITC, as well as tissue culture experiments using BRET. As they gain experience, they will have an opportunity to take ownership of a project. Applicants should submit a resume and application letter.

Faculty Advisor
David Williams
Research Supervisor
David Williams
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
9/1/2022

Undergrad research opportunities in pharmacoengineering lab

Post Date
08/17/2021
Description

Research in the Lai Lab is at the interface of mucus, immunology, nanotechnology, biomaterials, biophysics, bioengineering and modeling. We are currently working in three primary areas: (1) engineering antibodies for improved protection against pathogens and sperm at mucosal surfaces; (2) elucidating adaptive immune response (i.e. induction of antibodies) against nanomaterials; (3) phage engineering for targeted genetic modulation of the microbial communities; (4) cell and protein based immunotherapies for cancers; and (5) computational modeling. Our research has had strong translational impact, with multiple spinoff companies created based on our inventions that have led to multiple FDA-approved drugs as well as drugs currently in active clinical trials and preclinical development. Below are some example areas that we are looking for students.

Phage Engineering: We are actively developing a number of phage platforms that can deliver specific DNA into target bacterial within the complex microbial communities in the gut microbiome, with the goal of either correcting for the underlying cause of diseases caused by the microbiome (e.g. obesity and hypertension), or to convert these microbes into biofactories for production of biotherapeutics directly in the gut. Students will learn a variety of techniques ranging from cloning and molecular biology to phage production/characterization to a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays for assessing phage transduction potency.

Mucosal Immunology/Immunotherapy: The Lai Lab is broadly interested in engineering antibodies for a variety of mucosal applications, such as aerosol antibody therapy for a variety of acute respiratory infections or vaginally delivered antibodies for reinforcing female reproductive health. A number of such antibodies are currently in clinical and preclinical development. Students will gain exposure to a diverse skillsets in cloning and molecular biology, directed evolution (e.g. yeast display), flow cytometry and other functional assays.

Cancer immunotherapy: Bispecific antibody and vector engineering for cancer immunotherapy: We have been engineering bispecific antibodies that can perturb the immune microenvironment within tumors for enhanced immunotherapy, as well as developing vectors that can specifically target B- and T- cells for in vivo engineering of CAR-B and CAR-T cells, primarily focused on enhanced cellular therapy against cancer. Students will get exposed to diverse skillsets in cloning and molecular biology, cell culture, and flow cytometry.

All interested applicants should send a CV and informal transcript to Sam Lai.

Faculty Advisor
Sam Lai
Research Supervisor
Senior Grad Students & Postdocs in lab
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/31/2021

Research Assistant for software engineering for animal experiments

Post Date
07/20/2021
Description

We are seeking a highly motivated undergraduate research assistant with programming experience and an interest in neuroscience research to join our lab in the summer and/or fall. The student will collaborate with other research assistants and scientists in the lab to build an automated behavioral training box for lab animals. The student’s primary responsibility is computer and microcontroller programming. Thus, candidates with programming experience in C/C++ and/or Arduino are preferred. The position is ideal for students interested in engineering problems in scientific research, working with and learning from others with diverse engineering and scientific expertise in a collaborative research environment. The opportunity for research credit will be offered to dedicated research assistants following one semester of volunteer work. Applicants must be able to commit to working at least 20 hours per week during the summer or 15 hours per week during the semester with a fixed schedule and should have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. We provide outstanding mentorship, and many of our undergraduate research assistants have secured admission in competitive PhD programs. Please email Mengsen Zhang at mengsen_zhang@med.unc.edu and provide a cover letter, CV/resume, unofficial transcript, and availability for the summer and fall semesters (if known).

Faculty Advisor
Flavio Frohlich
Research Supervisor
Mengsen Zhang
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/13/2021

Hydrodynamic Quantum Analogs with Walking Droplets

Post Date
07/13/2021
Description

The Physical Mathematics Lab (PML) (Intro Video) offers a wide range of interdisciplinary problems that find motivation in very diverse fields, including soft matter, fluid mechanics, biophysics and quantum mechanics. One of PML’s themes is the study of new Hydrodynamic Quantum Analogs (HQAs) with walking drops (Video). Millimetric liquid drops can walk across the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, self-propelled through a resonant interaction with their own guiding or ‘pilot’ wave fields. These walking drops exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the quantum realm. This system has attracted a great deal of attention as it constitutes the first known and directly observable pilot-wave system of the form proposed by de Broglie in 1926 as a rational, realist alternative to the Copenhagen Interpretation (Video & Read). At PML, we work to unveil and rationalize new HQAs, thus challenging the limits between the quantum & classical worlds. Our investigations blend experiments & mathematical modeling (theory & simulations), we can thus tailor your project according to your interests & skills. Prior research experience is not necessary, you just need to be eager to learn!

Faculty Advisor
Pedro J. Saenz
Research Supervisor
Pedro J. Saenz
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/01/2022

Research Assistant – Politics of Crime in Latin America

Post Date
05/25/2021
Description

Seeking a research assistant for a project focused on the politics of crime and violence in Latin America. The project focuses on political rhetoric and policy proposals during election campaigns in Brazil and Mexico, particularly with regard to policies proposed to combat crime. The project seeks to understand how “progressive” and “conservative” politicians discuss these issues in high crime areas, and how their messaging is (or is not) distinct.
Opportunity for a student to engage in text-as-data work and develop data collection skills in the field of politics and political communication. The project will also provide the student with the opportunity to learn how a political science research project is developed and executed.

The student would assist with campaign platform text analysis, including cleaning text and identifying relevant political positions. The student must have basic to intermediate Portuguese skills, or at minimum advanced Spanish skills. In particular, appropriate for students with interests/majors in Political Science, PWAD, Global Studies, Public Policy, Communications, Conflict Management, Economics, Latin American Studies, Media and Journalism, and/or Portuguese and Spanish. A resume and short (1-2 paragraph) application letter that discusses student’s interest and relevant qualifications is required.

Faculty Advisor
Isabel Laterzo
Research Supervisor
Isabel Laterzo
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
05/31/2022

RAVE Lab Undergraduate Volunteer

Suggested Fields
Post Date
05/12/2021
Description

The Espelage Research Addressing Violence in Education (RAVE) lab housed in the UNC School of Education is looking for undergraduate volunteers for the Fall 2021 semester. Undergrad Research Assistants (RAs) and Interns work closely with the research team and principal investigator to support all aspects of the research process. Our RAs and Interns attend project meetings and work with the team on tasks including preparing surveys for data collection, transcribing interview data, processing data, conducting literature reviews and more. We are looking for students who are organized, responsible, eager to learn and interested in our areas of research. We aim to help our RA’s and interns develop the core competencies to prepare them for graduate school and research-oriented careers.

Faculty Advisor
Dorothy L. Espelage, Ph.D.
Research Supervisor
Ashley Woolweaver
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
Ongoing

Undergraduate Research on Machine Learning, Brain Image Analysis, Brain Development

Post Date
03/19/2021
Description

Research opportunities for motivated undergraduate students are available in the Baby Brain Mapping lab in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Research Imaging Center (BRIC). Our research mainly focuses on the development of machine learning-based computational techniques and tools for processing and analyzing neuroimaging data for discovery of brain structural, functional and connectivity development in fetal and infant brains. Two research directions are available. The first one is on the development of machine/deep learning methods for analyzing brain MR images. Good command of programming tools e.g., Python, Linux, and scripting are necessary to carry out the research work. The second direction is on applying our developed computational tools to study brain structural, functional and connectivity development during perinatal stages in both normal and at-risk subjects. Students will be expected to dedicate a minimum of 8-10 hours/week to the research project. We strongly encourage applications from diverse backgrounds.

Faculty Advisor
Gang Li
Research Supervisor
Gang Li
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/31/2021

Undergraduate Researcher

Post Date
03/09/2021
Description

The Bai Lab ( https://baigroup.org/ ) in the Department of Applied Physical Sciences (https://aps.unc.edu/ ) invites undergraduate students to join our team and carry on research in the field of bioelectronics and biophotonics. Our research focuses on both fundamental and applied study of soft materials and nanomaterials, develop fabrication approaches to enable hybrid integration of multi-materials towards high-performance electronic and photonic systems, innovate new technology that can intelligently immerse electronics and photonics into biological systems, and create new tools and devices to address unmet clinical needs and improve human healthcare. Our lab fosters a collaborative environment that converges expertise/interests from various backgrounds including materials science and engineering, electrical engineering, physics, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, and biomedical engineering. We provide hands-on learning, enjoy making practical tools, and aspire to transform scientific advancements into societal solutions. If you are interested in joining us, please send an email to wbai@unc.edu.

Faculty Advisor
Wubin Bai
Research Supervisor
Wubin Bai/Lin Zhang
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/31/2021

Research Assistant: Developmental Personality Neuroscience Laboratory

Post Date
12/16/2020
Description

Our lab studies learning, decision-making, and emotion in those with and without personality pathology (i.e., symptoms of personality disorders). In particular, our research investigates abnormalities underlying Borderline Personality Disorder and its development during adolescence and early adulthood. To study these topics, we use a variety of techniques including clinical interviewing, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), computational modeling, physiological recording, and diverse behavioral methods. Our research assistant position provides exposure to many aspects of psychology and neuroscience research, and can provide excellent preparation for a number of post-graduate opportunities (e.g., graduate school, research careers, clinical careers)! You can learn more about our research at https://dependlab.unc.edu/

We offer a variety of opportunities for students interested in clinical psychology, neuroscience, and personality research. Common tasks for this position include running participants through experimental sessions, participant recruitment and communications, data entry and data management, quality-checking brain images, preparing study materials, and more. Additionally, all RAs will attend lab meetings and complete a semester paper on a research topic of their choosing. Advanced students may elect to complete a senior honors thesis while in the lab. Interested students should complete our Undergraduate Research Assistant Application to be considered for a position. We accept new RAs into the lab on an as-needed basis, but are most likely to do so as the beginning of the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters.
Please contact our team at dependlab@unc.edu if you have any questions.

Interested students should complete our Undergraduate Research Assistant Application to be considered for a position. Please contact our team at dependlab@unc.edu if you have any questions.

Faculty Advisor
Michael Hallquist
Research Supervisor
Michael Hallquist
Faculty Email:
Type of Position
Availability
Website
Application Deadline
12/31/2021